From the Bottle Collection: Herold Bohemian Black Lager

Without intent, I have collected well over 1,000 beer bottles since the early 70s. When something finally had to be done about the cheap paneling in this old modular, I had a choice. Tear down the walls while, oh, so carefully, replacing the often rotted 1X3s. Or: cover them with The Bottle Collection.

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Written by Ken Carman

I remember this being quite good, and I’m not a fan of lagers. If you aren’t either then, if you like darker malts like in Stout or POrter, you might like some darker lagers like this. It’s not quite the same, but still similar enough to please the palate. They’re called “melanoidins” in brewing circles and they produce that deep, dark, sometimes very roasty, sense, without any burnt for the most part. Toasty? Yes. Usually they aren’t very hoppy, and I remember this as no exception. You may even think you’re drinking a beverage with a higher gravity/body that you really are. Darker malts can do that.

From the Czech Republic, using a double decoction… not that unusual for the style by any means especially amongst pro-brewers. That means they draw off some of the grist, heat it up, and then add it back in twice to raise the temp. Usually starts at 95 degrees, mash in, then about 122, then 150 or so, then mash out at 168… and some use a rest at about 140 to let the enzymes have a break/activate. Saaz used but, in my opinion from what I remember, you’d probably never know unless they left it out. The focus is on the malt.

Carbonation just a bit low. Nice head that faded a bit fast for me. But we are talking memory here, so it’s a bit of a guess.

I don’t have it in on my favorite case. If it weren’t a lager I might, simply because there’s still some of that lager/sulfur bite to keep it off. I do have at least one lager on that rack that I know of… more on that later.

I do recommend it.