A Matter of Taste

Written by Amanda Wishin

rszcorbisbeercb060272-1273509049Give me something that is both salty, sweet, hot and cold, and you have given me the perfect food. Yes, I will admit that am one of those people that dips French fries in Frosty’s. I am also someone that generally asks for the hoppiest beer on tap. This hasn’t always been the case. My taste in alcohol started off very sweet (think Mike’s Hard Raspberry Lemonade), transitioned to yellow fizz (oh the days of college and Keystone Light), and eventually became addicted to a variety of craft beer.

Tastebud Basics

The average adult has between 2,000 and 10,000 taste buds that perceive sweet, salty, sour, bitter, and potentially a fifth savory taste called umami. Salty and sour detection is needed to control salt and acid balance. Bitter detection warns of foods containing poisons. Sweet provides a guide to calorie-rich foods. Taste buds in combination with smell discern flavor.

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Mississippi Governor Signs Bill Legalizing Homebrewing

Press Release:

beer-news10(Boulder, CO) – The American Homebrewers Association (AHA) is pleased to announce that Mississippi Governor Phil Bryant has signed a bill that will effectively legalize homebrewing throughout the state. Mississippi is now the 49th state to permit homebrewing. A Senate version of the bill passed in early February and it was then voted on by the State House of Representatives in March.

“From our founding fathers to our current President, this country has a long and storied tradition of homebrewing,” said Gary Glass, director of the American Homebrewers Association. “We appreciate the support of all of the homebrewers, the dedicated grassroots efforts of Raise Your Pints and the legislators who have worked so diligently to make homebrewing a reality in Mississippi. We are grateful to Senator John Horhn who introduced this bill and to Governor Bryant for his quick action and support.”

aha-mississippi-e1363706731162-200x200The 21st Amendment predominantly leaves regulation of alcohol to the states. Therefore, even though homebrewing is federally legal, it is still up to individual states to legalize homebrewing in state codes. Prior to today’s announcement, Mississippi and Alabama were the only two states that did not allow homebrewing. The AHA will continue working with homebrewers in Alabama to legalize homebrewing.

The hobby of homebrewing has seen exponential growth in recent years. The AHA estimates that more than 1 million Americans brew beer or make wine at home at least once a year. Mississippi is home to an estimated 2,200 homebrewers who may now enjoy brewing without the restrictions of a state-wide ban.