Dayton’s beer? 8 things you should know about MillerCoors

MillerCoors Tour

(Just in case you think they’ve just gone away… PGA)

TRENTON —There is a strong possibility that the next six pack of Miller Lite you grab from you grocer’s shelves came from a brewery in Dayton’s backyard.

There is even a chance that one of your neighbors helped make it.

Denise A. Quinn, brewery vice president of MillerCoors sprawling facility roughly 35 miles away from Dayton in Trenton, said her plant annually pumps out 9 million barrels of Miller Lite, Miller Highlight, Coors Light, Keystone Ice, Miller Genuine Draft, Miller64, Miller High Life and more than 20 other MillerCoors brands. There are 31 gallons in each barrel.

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Beer notes: Hoppin’ Frog to release B.O.R.I.S. aged in Irish whiskey barrels

beernotes12

Hoppin’ Frog Brewery is putting another twist on its award-winning B.O.R.I.S. the Crusher Oatmeal-Imperial Stout.

Two years ago, the Akron brewery created B.O.R.I.S. Royale by aging the beer in Canadian whiskey barrels. Now, Hoppin’ Frog has created B.O.R.I.S. Bairille Aois by aging the beer in Irish whiskey barrels.

The Irish whiskey barrels impart more whiskey character and provide a more buttery and crisper edge to the beer than aging in Kentucky bourbon barrels, owner and brewer Fred Karm said.

The limited release beer will be available in 22-ounce bottles exclusively at the brewery, 1688 E. Waterloo Road. Hoppin’ Frog will be open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, and 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday for retail sales.

Karm — who declined to identify the brand of whiskey — said he expects B.O.R.I.S. Bairille Aois to be the biggest Hoppin’ Frog special release yet. Two food trucks, Wholly Frijoles and the Orange Truk, will be there Friday to help celebrate.

Bairille Aois, which is Celtic for barrel aged, will sell for $14.99 a bottle and there is a two-case limit per person.

Regular B.O.R.I.S. has won two gold medals at the Great American Beer Festival.

Speaking of Hoppin’ Frog, the tasting room and restaurant are getting closer to opening. Karm said he expects it to open “around July 1” — and B.O.R.I.S. Bairille Aois will be available on draft there.

“We’re really going to kick it out,” he said about the restaurant and tasting room.

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Manhattan Beer-Serving Barber Shop Owner Says He’ll Press on Despite Williamsburg Community Board Rejection

Ross Whitsett, 33, downing a Sixpoint IPA while he got a haircut at Blind Barber in Manhattan. The salon wants to expand to Williamsburg, but the local community board opposes it.

Ross Whitsett, 33, downing a Sixpoint IPA while he got a haircut at Blind Barber in Manhattan. The salon wants to expand to Williamsburg, but the local community board opposes it.

A trendy liquor-serving barber shop from Manhattan is buzzing ahead with its plan to open an outpost on a quiet Williamsburg block — even though the neighborhood’s community board rejected its bid for a liquor license this week.

Blind Barber owner Jeff Laub, 29, said he was unconcerned about the Community Board 1 vote Tuesday night or the utpouring of opposition as he takes his case to the State Liquor Authority, which has ultimate power of booze permits
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We Are King: California Outstrips Other States in Craft Beer and Breweries

Mapping the rise of craft beer

 

In case you hadn’t realized it, there’s a whole lot of brewing going on in Southern California. Don’t believe it? Read the New Yorker. The magazine has put together a slick interactive map that illustrates the dramatic growth of the craft beer industry.

Based on new data from the Brewers Assn., the map highlights which states have the most craft breweries, which produce the most craft beer and where the biggest and newest breweries are located.

 

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Brewing Up Black Gold

Gross Ale

Written by Dee Gross for crazycow252.blogspot.com/

My husband, the mad scientist…

Diving head-first into the world of craft brewing..

 

The long awaited brewing return has finally come, and husband came back with a bang.  He chose to make his triumphant return with a grand experiment. You may recall, in So…A Change in Plans 
this new creation is a combination of a Black Belgian Ale and a Tripel. It could very well be his greatest brew yet.

I will spare you the pain and torment of the cleaning, scrubbing, and scouring that goes into the preparation.  No time for that, let’s skip straight to the good parts.

First, you have to fill up the 10 gallon pot.

 

Beer Profile: NMBO Lobster Lovers

Profiled by Ken Carman for professorgoodales.net

11766_LLB5 Beer-Profile1-258x30044-150x150You know, western (of Mother Russia) beer always drives me crazy: fits no style, inappropriate balance, dark beers that are light and vica versa. This one is from Lithuania. The liqueur store “proudly” told me, “Must be good, it’s sold by Budweiser.” When I said “InBev” they looked at me blankly. My guess: distributed by whomever brings them Bud.

Just a hint darker than Bud. Head fades fast: sharp pinpoint and marginal in depth. Great clarity. As warms head seems to increase. Pinpoint head about 1/2 since before Sheriff shows up and the brewers/distillers start to hide their product.

Mouthfeel a bit slick, Pilsner malt dominant with just a hint of caramel malt. A little harsh on the palate and the roof of the mouth in a Belgian white candy sugar-way. Carbonation light, but despite this a bit insistent on the palate.

Nose is Belgian Tripel-ish with a hint of white sugar boost and pilsner malt in the background. No hops sense in any category, except a very mild bitter in the background.

This is 9.5%, supposedly: you’d never know. How they got there, if they did, I’m curious. None of the harsher ice bock-like alcohols.

I would have to say this most closely resembles a Belgian Tripel, though somewhat missing more complex sense. But I have to give them credit: they did a great job. Not my style: or even my fav off style if I’m wrong about “Tripel,” but this is like an American take on a Belgian Tripel: brewed in Belgium. Not a bad attempt at all.

I don’t see anything on the web stating InBev.  Brewed by..Rinkuškiai Alaus Darykloje .

69 on Beer Advocate, which declares it a “Euro Strong Lager.” And that style comes from…??? 14 on Rate Beer. YACK! BA is closer, in my opinion. It’s just a matter of what style you THINK it might be, I suppose. I’ve judged many Tripels, and this is very much like one.

I gave it a 3. Not quite worth a 4, but close to due to possible stylistic accuracy. It’s tough when a brewer doesn’t declare on the bottle.

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Welcome to the PGA beer rating system: one beer “Don’t bother.” Two: Eh, if someone gives it to you, drink. Three: very good, go ahead and seek it out, but be aware there is at least one problem. Four: seek it out. Five: pretty much “prefecto.”

Beer Profile: Hop Hash by Caldera

Profiled by Ken Carman for professorgoodales.net

caldera_hop_hash
6.5abv
Caldera Brewing
Ashland, Oregon

Beer-Profile1-258x300Nose: Cascade/grapefruit-like sense as open and sniff top of bottle.Pale malt way in the background. Not much else.

Appearance: a little hazy but I think that’s cold chill. Light gold in color: In the teens SRM-wise. White head is little rocks with a touch of pillow that lingers. About an inch and slowly fades but never quite goes away.

Hops on taste far less than nose. Great aroma but doesn’t translate into taste. Mouthfeel is caramelized malt: slight, that gets stronger as warms. Bitter is firm but more “slight” than it should be. There’s a fruity bitter:as bit orange-ish, that hangs mid-tongue. Carbonation full and firm.

Flavor: light pale malt with a soft, almost orange, bitter. That’s all. Could use more. I’m guessing they did a lot of early hoping on a basic pale. Not much else. Really not all that impressive: could use more hops in the taste, more complexity in that hopping.

Here is what their web site says…

Hop Hash: 6.5% ABV Hop Hash is a twist on the American-Style Strong Pale Ale/IPA using only pure lupulin for bitterness, flavor and aroma. This ale gets its name from pure hop lupulin extracted and scraped from the Hopunion pelletizing line.

Nice idea, I suppose, but misses a lot in the execution. You would think with a name like Hop Hash the hops would stand out more. There needs to be something to make me choose this from all the the other hop focused beers out the in what has become a very popular style.

Rate Beer: 85. 83 on Beer Advocate: both at the time this profile was written. Noticed the reviews were mixed from fairly high to far lower than mine.

Frankly I can’t rate it high, or real low, so three seems just right…
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Welcome to the PGA beer rating system: one beer “Don’t bother.” Two: Eh, if someone gives it to you, drink. Three: very good, go ahead and seek it out, but be aware there is at least one problem. Four: seek it out. Five: pretty much “prefecto.”

A Beer Judge’s Diary: Things to Consider When Planning a Competition

By Ken Carman

By Ken Carman

 I am hoping to make this an occasional feature in the Diary. Millie and I have been judging since the 90s, and since I travel a lot for work and judge occasionally on the road, and we like to do a few out of town competitions together… we get to see more competitions than some judges, I suppose.
 Sometimes it’s something that seems insignificant, like a top to a sample cup. These were those plastic cups most competitions use. I think this was at Knickerbocker in Albany: run by Saratoga Thoroughbrews. While it may seem small, there’s something very satisfying about being able to shake a glass as much as you want without getting your hand wet, or spilling it on yourself. Plus it can hold aroma in quite well while you inspect appearance. As judges well know aroma can be a fleeting thing, yet head can be too. To judge a beer it can be a chicken or egg situation, as in “which best to look at first, which will I lose faster if I don’t get to it first?” The top helps to resolve that. Continue reading “A Beer Judge’s Diary: Things to Consider When Planning a Competition”