A Budget Brewery Built From Shipping Containers

Starbucks has done it. Taco Bell has done it. And now it’s the microbrewery’s turn. The 40ft Brewery in Dalston, London, opened earlier this year. Its name comes from the fact that it was constructed out of two, 20-foot-long shipping containers that sit atop an old car park.

“The spot has a very short rolling lease from the council due to being part of a greater redevelopment plan for the area,” co-founder Andreas Pettersson says. “So by using shipping containers, we can turn this derelict place into a place to brew and serve great beer. If or when we need to move we can pick up our brewery to a new plot of land, we own the brewery and the containers.”

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Craft Beer at Time’s Precipice: Cellaring Tips

Written by Franz Hofer for A Tempest in a Tankard

To age, or not to age?

This temporal variation of a timeless existential question is one that’s being asked with growing frequency in the craft beer world.IMG_2369But even if cellaring beer has become an increasingly popular topic of conversation of late, it’s still relative terra incognita for the craft beer community writ large.

Beer and Time. To age, or not to age? You’d be forgiven for considering the question absurd, for we’ve been conditioned to think that old beer is bad beer. And in most cases, beer doesn’t fight a winning battle with time.

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Beer Profile: Sierra Nevada’s Spiced Stout

Profiled by Ken Carman

Beer-Profile3beer_272055Creamy tan pillow head that fades fast. 30 srm, or tad lower. Edge of glass cling lingers once head disappears. Obsidian: strong light only shines through showing murky, yellow, highlights.

Aroma: ginger and a whiff of lime.

Mouthfeel: silky and abrasive at the same time due to spice/lime dominance. Low carbonation, almost no tingle from that.

Flavor: to be honest the spices conflict with basic stout recipe. And the spices are harsh, abrasive. Except color, there’s little stout here, just spices. The lime creates an annoying tang that doesn’t compliment, simply distracts: and I like lime. Maybe with just a slight hint might work, even then: questionable.

Where’s the stout? If any it’s the roasted barley combining with spice, and the lime, to increase the abrasiveness.

2.8: probably the lowest rank I’ve ever given a Sierra. In fact it may be one of the lowest ranks I’ve given at PGA. This is so out of balance it’s almost offensive.

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Welcome to the PGA beer rating system: one beer “Don’t bother.” Two: Eh, if someone gives it to you, drink. Three: very good, go ahead and seek it out, but be aware there is at least one problem. Four: seek it out. Five: pretty much “perfecto.”

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kendrawWarning! Warning! Ken Carman to your left! Reverse thrusters! Collision alert! Oh, dang, there you’ve gone and done it: you got some Ken Carman on our flying spaghetti monster.

Well that experience was a little… WARPED.

Beer Profile: Ithaca Brewing’s Embrr Rye Porter

Itporter

Profiled by Maria Devan

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I love the scent of rye, it's crisp even on the nose.

Soft creamy body. Chocolate that's light and a malty presence that is sweet with a lovely ribbon of caramel. Light brown sugar and hearty rye. A good herbal hop that stays in the background but lends a perfect bitterness to this one as it finishes long and lingers smooth with a bit of fruitiness. Lighter flavors rather than robust.

Enjoyable.

4

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Welcome to the PGA beer rating system: one beer “Don’t bother.” Two: Eh, if someone gives it to you, drink. Three: very good, go ahead and seek it out, but be aware there is at least one problem. Four: seek it out. Five: pretty much “perfecto.”

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mdMaria Devan lives in Ithaca, NY. That’s Ithaca: home to Ithaca Brewing and Bandwagon. She writes about beer frequently, so that means she samples a lot of beer. The professor is jealous.

Opinion: Why Oskar Blues chose craft beer over $1 billion

 

Oskar Blues founder Dale Katechis: ‘I considered the private-equity guys the ones with the evil horns who come in and break your business all for the sake of profit.’
Craft beer is getting awfully serious for what was supposed to be the irreverent, dressed-down younger sibling of industrial macro beer.

Just last week, San Diego-based brewer and distiller Ballast Point sold to Corona brewer and distributor Constellation Brands STZ, +3.24%  for $1 billion. That’s roughly $8,300 for each of the 123,000 barrels of Sculpin IPA, Grunion Pale Ale and Victory at Sea Imperial Porter in the roughly 26 states in Ballast Point’s distribution radius.

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Mind The Gap: Coarse vs. Fine Crush| exBEERiment Results!

When I started brewing about 3 years ago, I jumped right into all grain using 1 gallon kits then soon after bought a batch sparge setup with converted coolers for larger batches. I made many good beers, no doubt, but I found myself pining for a less complicated method, one that didn’t involve as much setup or clean-up but resulted in a finished product with similar quality. It wasn’t until a year or so later I learned about Brew In A Bag (BIAB) and, amid a run to win my homebrew club’s Homebrewer of the Year title, abruptly adopted it as my primary approach after buying a used e-BIAB system on a whim, sending me down a much simpler and less time consuming path.

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Brewcrafting: NHC 2016

nhcIf you are familiar at all with the 2008 BJCP guidelines (AKA every competition for the past seven years) then you are mostly familiar with the major categories for the 2016 competition–with three differences:
1.American Pale Ale, American IPA, and Strong Stouts (Tropical, Foreign Extra, American, and Imperial) have all been split into separate categories to better distribute entries in highly impacted categories.
2.Specialty IPA is now a sub-category of IPA, so stop entering your Black/Brown/Red/White/Session IPAs in the Specialty Beer category! 🙂
3.Many of the new 2015 BJCP styles have been added to what are essentially the 2008 major categories, so go wild entering your Gose, Wheatwine, and Sahti (amongst others) as first-class styles.

Otherwise everything else should feel pretty familiar, just make sure you review the updated style guidelines; many of them have been significantly updated. For instance, English Pale Ales mention significantly less caramel character than previous years after the guideline committee admitted the older guidelines were based on old/oxidized imported examples (which increases perception of caramel).

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Beer Profile: Sam Adams’ White Christmas

Profiled by Ken Carman

white christmas_largeNutmeg and orange peel with faint hint of what way in the background. Pale malt up front, but even that is faint.

Mouthfeel: very light on the body, final (FG) gravity-wise. Little to no wheat or cinnamon. But otherwise spices dominate very slightly. Swallows almost as if it’s water. Slight, abrasive abv due to lite malt.

Appearance: tad wheat foggy, very pale gold, big small bubble head in small glass, but goes flat quickly. Pillow head, big at first but fades fast.

Flavor: spices slightly up front with light malt background. Wheat way in background.No hops sensed.

This is a lawnmower beer for a non-lawnmower season. Good, but sell-able? We’ll see. Not impressive. For light quaff, not bad, but boring.

42 and 29 Rate Beer. 79/78 on BA.

Great level entry Christmas beer for those just coming to craft from Bud and Miller. For craft beer folks: not so much… like weak tea.

3.8

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Welcome to the PGA beer rating system: one beer “Don’t bother.” Two: Eh, if someone gives it to you, drink. Three: very good, go ahead and seek it out, but be aware there is at least one problem. Four: seek it out. Five: pretty much “perfecto.”

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kendraw That’s NOT Maria Devan. That’s Ken Carman to your left. Can’t you tell the difference?

Beer Profile: Alpine Beer Company’s Duet

duet

Profiled by Maria Devan

This one couldn’t wait until Sunday smile emoticon. Alpine Duet. Pours hazy yellow a brilliant kiss form orange. Pours out like light you can see it in my photo. Thin white head that wants to hang on. Nose is explosive with tropical. Crisp honey dew melon. Herbal hop that has a woody backing. Orange blossom honey.

Perfect mouthfeeel . The eptiome of lightness. Crisp lightly sweet, bubbly beer. The catty spice from the simcoe takes this one to the finish and doesn’t back down. Impressive tailored bitterness. At the very swallow the woody earthy hop. Bitter, drying. it seems to evaporate after all this fireworks of flavor.

Well worth the seven dollars and change for the bomber. Drinks like hops juice with all the succulence of the hops. a light orangey citrus in the background. Hop nectar. They leave a light pepper on the tongue as it lingers dank and fruity. I’ll have more.

Stunning.

4.5

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Welcome to the PGA beer rating system: one beer “Don’t bother.” Two: Eh, if someone gives it to you, drink. Three: very good, go ahead and seek it out, but be aware there is at least one problem. Four: seek it out. Five: pretty much “perfecto.”

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mdThat’s Maria Devan. In the picture. Between the two guys.

A Beer Judge’s Diary: Preparing to Judge Using the 2015 Guidelines

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Courtesy mashbang.wordpress.com
Courtesy mashbang.wordpress.com
 I must admit: being off the grid, running a homebrew competition and work limiting my time to “get down” with the new 2015 BJCP guidelines, I never had much of a chance to comment. My fault. My loss.
  After all the vetting there’s not much I can say that would have much affect, but I know everyone at the BJCP has been turning blue, still holding their breath, thinking, “But, what does Ken think?”
  Yes, that sarcasm nugget was aimed at myself.
 So, like the white rabbit in Alice, since I’m beyond “late” for that review date, I think my commentary time would be best spent making suggestions on how to live with, how to view, how to use, and a valuable way to learn, the new guidelines.
  First, let me recommend a concept to homebrew clubs that the Clarksville (TN) Carboys are working on. Last Saturday (11/14/15), during the monthly meetings, we took examples of 2015 category 2 and sampled them while looking over the guidelines. memebeerdate Some categories may be tough to do this with, like category 3: Czech lagers. Finding examples may be tough, especially in more rural regions. I would say, ”brew it yourself then compare,” but considering the cost, the effort, and how tough some of these styles are to brew right, not sure how useful that advice might be. Continue reading “A Beer Judge’s Diary: Preparing to Judge Using the 2015 Guidelines”