Beer Profile: Wolaver

goSKFaU

Profiled by Maria Devan


Pours dark brown with a tan creamy head that clings and leaves lace.

Nose is coffee, light brown sugar, dark fruit, nuts and caramel. Light pepper from hops.

Taste is mellow as some bold coffee without bitterness comes across the palate smooth and with the nutty taste of caramel. Low diacetyl presence. Soft creamy mouthfeel shows you roasty malt and a dry-ish finish. Light cream to lingers with firm caramel as hops balance the beer perfectly with a moderate bitterness.

4

3361242-simple-drawing-of-a-pint-of-beer-isolated-on-white3361242-simple-drawing-of-a-pint-of-beer-isolated-on-white3361242-simple-drawing-of-a-pint-of-beer-isolated-on-white3361242-simple-drawing-of-a-pint-of-beer-isolated-on-white

Welcome to the PGA beer rating system: one beer “Don’t bother.” Two: Eh, if someone gives it to you, drink. Three: very good, go ahead and seek it out, but be aware there is at least one problem. Four: seek it out. Five: pretty much “perfecto.”

1-2-3-4-5-fingers-on-hand1

____________________________________Beer HERE

___________________________________________________________________

mdMaria Devan lives in Ithaca, NY and is a great beer writer. She has regular beer Sundays where she profiles brews, reviews brews online with homebrewers and other beer community connected bloggers. She’s judged beer at a homebrew competition and been a steward. And she’s kind of short. But that’s OK.

Beer in Central Arkansas

Written by Tom Becham

hotsprings_048_mIn years past, I have made several visits to see family in Arkansas. Until just two years ago, what greeted me in the central portion of that state – around Little Rock and Hot Springs – was what I call a Beer Desert. That has changed. While the northwest corner of the state, home to Fayetteville and the huge University of Arkansas campus, has been fully aboard the craft beer train for awhile now, the rest of the state seems to have caught up with it.
Continue reading “Beer in Central Arkansas”

Mead, a Beverage From the Middle Ages, Makes a Comeback

By TAMMY LA GORCE

In an alley behind a shopping mall in Vauxhall, a modern version of a fermented beverage popular in the Middle Ages is being produced, sampled and sold: mead.

Melovino, the only commercial meadery in the state, opened just over a year ago and has already won 19 awards, including a gold medal in March at the Mazer Cup International, a prominent mead competition in Colorado.

Want to read more?Please click…

HERE

Innovation Brewing in Sylva wins round in trademark dispute with Bell’s Brewery

innovation_brewing_sylva_2015

Innovation Brewing, a small craft brewer in Sylva, has won a significant round in the ongoing trademark dispute with Bell’s Brewery, the big Michigan-based brewer that filed a federal action against Innovation this spring. Bell’s aimed to stop Innovation from using its name, saying that the unregistered Bell’s ad slogan “bottling innovation since 1985” could lead to confusion among beer drinkers. The slogan isn’t used on any beer packaging.

In a Sept. 5 decision, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office ruled on a motion in the ongoing dispute. Here’s a snippet from the decision, and the “Opposer” referenced here is Bell’s”

Want to read more?Please click…

HERE

Short & Shoddy | My 1 Hour All Grain Brew Day

On average, I brew a couple batches every other week, all of which are for xBmts or The Hop Chronicles. A recent Saturday was one of these days, I brewed two 5 gallon batches simultaneously for a yet to be published xBmt. The next morning, I woke up early with my kids, made some breakfast, and did a few normal weekend chores. Right after lunch, my wife mentioned she had some errands to run, said she’d be out for a couple hours and would take my oldest daughter. My 2 year-old was napping at this point and my son wanted to ride his bike. That’s when the idea to try something I’d been thinking about for awhile struck– brew an all grain batch in as little time as possible. I set a goal for myself to be finished by the time my wife returned home, which she estimated would be approximately 2 hours. What follows is an account of how it went down, from grain to glass.

As my wife was prepping to leave, right about the time this brilliant idea came to me, I opened up BeerSmith and threw together a very simple SMaSH recipe. Inspired by the latest boil length xBmt findings, I chose to use some 2 year old German Pils malt I found sitting in the bottom of a bucket earlier that weekend. To that, I added Amarillo hops from the 2013 crop I’d been avoiding and a pack of Mangrove Jacks West Coast Yeast that expired nearly a year prior. This was bound to be glorious.

Short & Shoddy SMaSH 

Batch Size Boil Time IBU SRM OG FG ABV
1.75 15 min 65  11.6 1.040 SG 1.009 SG 4.0 %

Fermentables

Name Amount %
2 year old Weyermann German Pils Malt(1.6L) 3 lbs 100

Hops

Name Amt/IBU Time Use Form Alpha %
Amarillo 20 g/19.4 IBU First Wort Hop – 15 minutes FWH Pellet  8.2
Amarillo 35 g/19.3 IBU 1 minute Boil Pellet  8.2
Amarillo 40g Dryhop 4 Days Dry Hop Pellet  8.2

Yeast

Name Lab Attenuation Ferm Temp
M44 West Coast Yeast (exp. 12/2014) Mangrove Jacks 73% 66°F

I chose to use the BIAB method for this project and collected the full volume of water, unfiltered and untreated, as my wife pulled out of the garage.

Start time: 10:05 AM

01_15minAPA_fullvolliquor

Want to read more? Please click…

HERE

Brew Biz: Werts and All

      The Topic: The Corporate Mugging of Craft Beer

 “Fascism should more appropriately be called Corporatism because it is a merger of state and corporate power”
― Benito Mussolin

2836459
By Ken Carman
By Ken Carman
 Ken Carman is a BJCP judge; homebrewer since 1979, club member at Escambia Bay, Clarksville Carboys and Music City Homebrewers, who has been interviewing professional brewers all over the east coast for over 10 years. This edition of Brew Biz also appears as an edition of Inspection, another column by Ken Carman. This is by request of the author who feels this topic goes beyond beer.

 When beer boards, or government, and big corporations, join hands: especially to decide what the public can/can’t have, and to help hinder, even crush, small business, that’s certainly yet another step closer to “fascism….” -Moi’


 Can anyone tell me what’s good about the recent purchase of SBMiller by Bud’s owner, InBev? Context: I mean “good” for the consumer, beer lovers, beer world, healthy competition, less big corporate influence in politics, less corporate attempts to squash the multitude of small breweries, brewpubs, employees… not just “good for” management, corporately corrupted beer boards, CEOs or stockholders. Continue reading “Brew Biz: Werts and All”

Budweiser maker Anheuser-Busch InBev reaches $107B deal for SABMiller

Anheuser-Busch InBev on Wednesday formalized a deal to acquire its British-South African rival SABMiller for $107 billion, creating a gigantic global beer company in an era when many drinkers are imbibing beers from smaller brewers.

The companies had been weighing a deal since mid-September, with SABMiller rejecting several overtures from the Belgian firm before accepting the deal.

The acquisition gives Budweiser maker AB InBev a critical path into developing markets. SABMiller gets 35% of its revenue from Latin America and 34% from Africa.

Want to read more? Please click…

HERE

Beer Profile: Brooklyn’s Insulated

binsulated
My last beer to end the weekend tasting festivities. A happy hello to Monday and cheers to you all!

Profiled by Maria Devan

Beer-Profile3Brooklyn uses the word nimble to describe this beer and I think it’s the perfect word to do it. Pours the darkest brown with a with a glowing tint from ruby. Fat tan head that fell slowly to cling and leave lace. Nose is hop prominent alright! At least at first it is because ti’s so fresh. they seem to burst forth.. Beautiful spice and floral from those noble hops. They shimmer even on the nose. A fruitiness that smells fresh and vibrant and a firm hop herbal that is just darn sexy. The malt that seemed shy at first keeps coming forward until you have earthy coffee, bread like pumpernickel. Flavor is mellow earthy and round. Those abundantly fragrant hops are much lighter on the palate but the herbal is the most forward flavor from them. Peppery. Coffee and a tempting dryness from the malt. Here is the part that I think is nimble. It’s so dry as to show itself off. A touch nutty, toasty and all that bread. The bitterness int he flavor is just a light touch from both hops and the malt itself and that highlights the earthy coffee . It also shows me some very smooth richness from the malt that is not caramel. Oh boy! It finishes like silk with only a tickle from bubbles and gives up some bitter chocolate in the last moments. No harshness, no astringency, no diacetyl. Lingers leisurely and shows you a last peek at those hops and all that roastiness. Just a light residual sweetness. Nimble indeed and very hearty while showing a subtle richness underneath that is the very expression of the black beer. Classic and extremely well done.

4.2

3361242-simple-drawing-of-a-pint-of-beer-isolated-on-white3361242-simple-drawing-of-a-pint-of-beer-isolated-on-white3361242-simple-drawing-of-a-pint-of-beer-isolated-on-white3361242-simple-drawing-of-a-pint-of-beer-isolated-on-white

Welcome to the PGA beer rating system: one beer “Don’t bother.” Two: Eh, if someone gives it to you, drink. Three: very good, go ahead and seek it out, but be aware there is at least one problem. Four: seek it out. Five: pretty much “perfecto.”

1-2-3-4-5-fingers-on-hand1

________________________________________Beer HERE

___________________________________________________________________

mdMaria Devan lives in Ithaca, NY and is a great beer writer. She has regular beer Sundays where she profiles brews, reviews brews online with homebrewers and other beer community connected bloggers. She’s judged beer at a homebrew competition and been a steward. And she’s kind of short. But that’s OK.

Worth the Risk: Homebrewers Playing with Coolships

Coolship 1

T.S. Eliot once said, “Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go.” Homebrewers are doing just that in their exploration of open fermentation.

Case in point is Johnnie Leroy Compton III, a homebrewer who goes the distance for his wild beers. After moving into a spacious 19th-century house in Liverpool, PA, he converted one of the rooms into a brewery and began using improvised coolships—open fermentation systems that collect ambient yeast and bacteria to ferment wort. Then, he experimented by adding dregs from his favorite sour ales alongside open fermentation.

Want to read more? Please click…

HERE

10 Hippest Brewery Owners in New York

Matthew and Lauri - Moustache Brewing Company

New York is full of wonderful people and great beer. The beer is as good as the people who make them. If you happen to be in New York, go and check out all the wonderful breweries out there that are owned by some of the hippest people of New York. Compiled here is a list of 10 hippest brewery owners in New York who love the beer they make and would love to share their brews for you to enjoy for many years to come.

1. Matthew and Lauri – Moustache Brewing Company

Want to read more? Please click…

HERE