Beer Profile: Birra Del Borgo’s Dodici

dodici

Profiled by Maria Devan

Beer-Profile3I have not had a beer from birra del borgo before and when I saw this I grabbed it. The number on the bottle says 25 but the word is dodici and that does not mean twenty five. This is a Christmas beer as you may have guessed because docici /25 would be 12/25. The brewer lists this as a winter warmer but I think this beer is one of the best barleywines I have tried. In the category of barleywines you will notice three variations on the style. The american barleywine, the english barleywine and the old ale. However because of the addition of bitter orange peel it is classified as a winter warmer. This beer is 9.5 percent. Malts are Pilsner malt, Munich , vienna , cara munich , cara weizen, chocolate. Hops are hallertau northern brewer, hallertau hersbrucker, styrian golding, simcoe.

Dodici

Pours a sweet rusty orange. hazier at first then clearing with a few big bubbles but no head in the tasting glass.

Nose is brown sugar, orange, toffee, spice, hints of lemon, caramel and earth.

Drinks beautifully. Complex malt and vivacious fruity character. Rich and mellow but the hops dance on the palate. Pepper, spice and a generous herbal. Orange. The herbal form the hops will show you a very generous malt that is so sweetly done you almost have to close your eyes to really see it fully. When you do you will taste nuts, brittle caramel or hard crack caramel, sweet cake-y bread. A wild hint of medicinal alcohol and then the perfect swallow. No harshness, no bite and hardly any bitterness from all those hops. Instead the bitterness you taste is from the orange and that is a bit of an illusion because the tip of your tongue does tingle a little as you notice a light mineral softness to the body of the beer. Tobacco leaf, light cocoa. It feels like silk.

This was one of the best beers I have had this year . Cheers and Happy New Year everyone!

4.5

3361242-simple-drawing-of-a-pint-of-beer-isolated-on-white3361242-simple-drawing-of-a-pint-of-beer-isolated-on-white3361242-simple-drawing-of-a-pint-of-beer-isolated-on-white3361242-simple-drawing-of-a-pint-of-beer-isolated-on-white

Welcome to the PGA beer rating system: one beer “Don’t bother.” Two: Eh, if someone gives it to you, drink. Three: very good, go ahead and seek it out, but be aware there is at least one problem. Four: seek it out. Five: pretty much “perfecto.”

1-2-3-4-5-fingers-on-hand1

_________________________________________Beer HERE

___________________________________________________________________

mdMaria Devan lives in Ithaca, NY and is a great beer writer. That’s Maria in the middle. The other two are not, but they are lucky to have her as a friend.

The Craft Beer Industry’s Turf War Begins in Earnest in 2017

 

If you contemplated the contents of your pint glass deeply enough this year, you likely have some idea of where the United States beer industry is headed in 2017.

At the end of 2016, I was asked by the hosts of a couple of beer podcasts for my thoughts on what lies ahead for U.S. beer brewers, distributors and drinkers. This column began answering that question as early as March, when it pointed out that the number of craft beer brands and products on taps and on store shelves had tripled in seven years. By November, the number of brewers in the U.S. topped 5,000 and was continuing to grow, even if sales of the beers they were producing saw growth slip into single-digit percentages for the first time in years.

In a beer market that’s quickly saturating, just about everyone is looking for dry ground. Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD, +0.21% with the U.S. government watching closely after its acquisition of SABMiller, seems to have made the last of its craft beer acquisitions (in Texas, no less), and is looking to expand its current stable of U.S. craft brands, its stateside marketing efforts and its reach in its craft brands’ home markets.

 

Want to read more? Please click…


HERE

6 Common Homebrew Myths with Denny Conn

connAlthough Charles Dickens was talking about the French Revolution when he wrote those words, you’d almost think that he was talking about the flow of homebrewing information today. We have unprecedented access to homebrewing information and ingredients, which is a wonderful thing. But at the same time, we almost have an overload of information, and as anyone who has ever tried to hit every booth at Homebrew Con Club Night can tell you, it’s possible to have too much of a good thing!

Want to read more? Please click…

HERE

Beer Profile: Goodwood Walnut Brown

Profiled by Ken Carman for PGA

Beer-Profile3 This Louisville brewery is somewhat new to me, but to be honest other brews I’ve had have been, well, Goodwood-Walnut-Brown-Ale-Beer-Bottleunimpressive.

Not this one. Yes, the wood and the nut are a tad overbearing, but the brown is there. Even ta hop bitter pops out as it warms. The aroma is almost wine like, and I get that in the taste too. Low carbonation, most of it in a huge big pillow, big bubble, head. The body is lighter than it seems: low side of medium. The bitter it’s the top of the palate.

There a tad pepper sense to it too, but I think that’s the wood, walnut coming though.

Great clarity with a light brown.

Very quaffable.

36, 33 style on Rate Beer (Wow!) 82 on BA.

4

3361242-simple-drawing-of-a-pint-of-beer-isolated-on-white3361242-simple-drawing-of-a-pint-of-beer-isolated-on-white3361242-simple-drawing-of-a-pint-of-beer-isolated-on-white3361242-simple-drawing-of-a-pint-of-beer-isolated-on-white

Welcome to the PGA beer rating system: one beer “Don’t bother.” Two: Eh, if someone gives it to you, drink. Three: very good, go ahead and seek it out, but be aware there is at least one problem. Four: seek it out. Five: pretty much “perfecto.”

1-2-3-4-5-fingers-on-hand1

____________________________________Beer HERE

___________________________________________________________________

Ken Ken Carman isn’t his real name. He’s not even human. Short, annoying, supposedly from Mars, “Ken” eats rocks and doesn’t jump very well, Earth’s gravity is so high. But he likes beer.

5 little-known facts about women’s role in brewing history

Beer and women.  Women and beer.  Nowadays, when you think of the two, you probably fall in line with what’s shown in commercials: a manly drink with bold flavors brought to you by buxom, scantily-clad ladies.  While that all sounds like a good time, it really couldn’t be further from the truth of beer’s origins and how brewing was throughout most of history.  Most people wouldn’t think that brewing beer was originally a woman’s responsibility or something that fell within the homemaker’s domain.  So, in honor of International Women’s day this March 8th, let’s take a look back at the history of beer and see just what kind of role women played in it.

1.  Beer led to Civilization, and women were its brewers

Godin Tepe - one of the first brewing sites
 Want to read more? Please click…

HERE

Beer Profile: Sierra Nevada’s Otra-Vez

Profiled by Ken Carman for PGA

otravez-bottle-pint2016I usually love almost anything Sierra does, but this has some issues. “Lemon?” yes. “Sourness,” slight if any. Doughy malt? NO. Salt is close to absent. Nose is pretty much lemon. Hint of sour in aroma, true. No hops, as expected.

Head almost none existent. Some haze. Light yellow. Hint of pepper from coriander.

Low carbonation, at best, light body. Suggest more wheat for mouthfeel, wheat sense absent.

Misses the mark in several categories, but a great quaff.

84 on BA, 81 Ratebeer.

3.8

3361242-simple-drawing-of-a-pint-of-beer-isolated-on-white3361242-simple-drawing-of-a-pint-of-beer-isolated-on-white3361242-simple-drawing-of-a-pint-of-beer-isolated-on-white

Welcome to the PGA beer rating system: one beer “Don’t bother.” Two: Eh, if someone gives it to you, drink. Three: very good, go ahead and seek it out, but be aware there is at least one problem. Four: seek it out. Five: pretty much “perfecto.”

1-2-3-4-5-fingers-on-hand1

____________________Beer HERE

___________________________________________________________________

The Lost Abbey’s 10 Commandments: A Warming Beer for Winter Evenings

Written by Franz Hofer for A Tempest in a Tankard

The last autumn leaves cling to the trees, holding out against the onslaught of wind and the first snowflakes of the season. A dense fog shrouds Vienna’s church spires in mystery. Night has descended, and the last faint warmth of the day has long since faded. I cut through the park and pause at the side of a partially frozen pond where a few ducks seem to be wishing they had followed the geese south. Spring is a long way off, I think to myself, and make for home where a warming drink of malty goodness awaits.

Want to read more? Please click…

HERE

Tankards Everywhere: Tempest’s Beerscapes of 2016

img_0001

Written by Franz Hofer for A Tempest in a Tankard

I was as at Schloss Belvedere a few days back, the famous Viennese museum that houses the even more famous Kiss by Gustav Klimt. Alongside some of his other iconic works such as Judith und Holofernes hung several paintings dating from the year of Klimt’s death in 1918, all containing the word “unvollendet” (incomplete) somewhere in the title. Like Schubert’s 8th Symphony –– Die Unvollendete –– Klimt’s incomplete works gesture tantalizingly toward what would have been.

Want to read more? Please click…

HERE